How is this for a Crazy Idea?

I had just returned from presenting at the Learning and Brain Conference on Creativity in Teaching and Learning when I received a call from Jenny Knight, the director of the Lower School at Miami Country Day School. Two of her teachers had participated in a workshop that I conducted using improvisation in the classroom to develop literacy skills and content knowledge. “We would love to have you at our school and teach the faculty about using improvisation in the classroom,” Jenny announced. As we discussed the professional development, Jenny mused, “How is this for a crazy idea?” As soon as she asked the question, I knew I found a kindred education spirit.

Jenny proposed that we teach parents some improvisation games on Back to School Night. As a mother I had always experienced Back to School Nights that were more informational sessions than showing me what my children were actually doing in the classroom. I thought it was brilliant, especially given the Miami Country Day School environment in which creativity, collaboration, and student centered learning is paramount. Jenny, her colleagues and I plotted and planned. We decided to teach three improvisation games to the parents. The teachers would model the games, then the parents would play the games, and we provided opportunities for curricular applications. Imagine a gymnasium with 200 parents and teachers all playing improvisation games like Zip-Zap-Zop, Alphabet, and Parts of a Whole. These games promote conceptualization of complex ideas. There was laughter and engagement in a community that not only espouses creativity and collaboration, but practices it.

The teachers lead the parents in a game of Zip-Zap-Zop (Miami Country Day School 2016)

The teachers lead the parents in a game of Zip-Zap-Zop (Miami Country Day School 2016)

Parents listen to instruction for Improv in the Classroom activity (Miami Country Day School 2016)

Parents listen to instruction for Improv in the Classroom activity (Miami Country Day School 2016)